Brian Clegg - Graviatational Waves
Image

Transforms a frustrating, century-long tale of disappointment into a gripping human drama

Simon Ing New Scientist

Brian Clegg

In 2015, after 50 years of searching, gravitational waves were detected for the first time and astronomy changed forever. In 2017, the project's leading scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Astronomy has always depended on electromagnetic radiation: visible light, radio, X-rays and the rest. But gravitational waves - ripples in the fabric go space time predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity - can pass through barriers that stop light dead.

At the two LIGO observatories in the US, scientists developed incredibly sensitive detectors, capable of spotting a movement 100 times smaller than the nucleus of an atom. They recorded the ripples produced by two black holes spiralling into each other, setting spacetime quivering.

This was the first time black holes had ever been directly detected - but it promises far more for the future of astronomy. One day, we may be able to look back to the first seconds of the universe itself.

Image
Enter the name for this tabbed section: Buy a copy

If you’d like a signed copy - it makes a great gift - purchase direct below. If you want a personalised inscription, just drop Brian an email at [email protected] at the same time with the details.

Paperback
Kindle
Nook
Kobo
Apple
Enter the name for this tabbed section: Reviews

Reviews

[Brian Clegg] is such a prolific writer of popular science, it is easy to forget how good he is… Clegg delivers an impressive double punch: he transforms a frustrating, century-long tale of disappointment into a gripping human drama, affording us a vivid glimpse into the uncanny, depersonalised and sometimes downright demoralising operations of big science. And readers still come away wishing they were physicists. Simon Ings, New Scientist

Succinctly explains what gravitational waves are, how their existence was predicted, and methods by which they might be detected. It describes the design and construction of LIGO, the detections that have been made with it, and their physical interpretation. And there’s a substantial concluding chapter on what the future holds for gravitational wave astronomy. Andrew May, Popular Science review site

To keep up to date via Facebook, click Like Page to follow the Brian Clegg page:

See more of Brian's books
 Drop Images Here 

Stacks Image 41520_73
Stacks Image 41520_70
Stacks Image 41520_67
Stacks Image 41520_63
Stacks Image 41520_61
Stacks Image 41520_59
Stacks Image 57
Stacks Image 55
Stacks Image 53
Stacks Image 51
Stacks Image 3
Stacks Image 5
Stacks Image 7
Stacks Image 9
Stacks Image 11
Stacks Image 13
Stacks Image 15
Stacks Image 17
Stacks Image 19
Stacks Image 21
Stacks Image 23
Stacks Image 25
Stacks Image 27
Stacks Image 29
Stacks Image 31
Stacks Image 33
Stacks Image 35
Stacks Image 37
Stacks Image 39
Stacks Image 41
Stacks Image 43
Stacks Image 45
© Brian Clegg - Privacy Statement - Contact Brian